Some account of Croyland Abbey, Loncolnshire from the mss. and drawings of the Rev. William Stukeley. by John M. Gresley

Cover of: Some account of Croyland Abbey, Loncolnshire | John M. Gresley

Published by W. & J. Hextall in Ashby-de-la-Zouch .

Written in English

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Edition Notes

Read the the general meeting of the Leistershire Architectural ana Archaelogical Society, Sept. 10th, 1855, by the Rev. John M. Gresley.

Book details

ContributionsStukeley, William.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17374925M

Download Some account of Croyland Abbey, Loncolnshire

Priest: Enquiries concerning a baptism, wedding, funeral, or pastoral matter should be addressed to the s Brown, Priest-in-charge, Crowland Parish (tel.

[email protected] Tours: Guided tours should be arranged with Mr. David Searle (tel. Open Times: The church is open for visitors every day from a.m. until p.m. Having just got involved with the Abbey I was really interested in obtaining this book.

However, you can imagine how disappointed I was to find that it is indeed a copy of the original text and apart from the Preface and some notes, it is written entirely in medieval s: 3.

Buy Some Account Of Croyland Abbey, Lincolnshire () by Stukeley, William (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on Author: William Stukeley. Buy Some Account of Croyland Abbey, Lincolnshire () by Stukeley, William (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on. Read this book on Questia. Read the full-text online edition of Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland with the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers: With the Continuations by Peter of Blois and Anonymous Writers (). Monasticism And Religious Orders--England--Lincolnshire--History--Middle Ages.

Crowland Abbey, Lincolnshire The abbey of Crowland (or Croyland) was dedicated to the Anglo-Saxon Saint Guthlac, a noble warrior who became a hermit. It is best known today for the Crowland Chronicles, of which several continuations were compiled at the abbey during the later fifteenth century.

Crowland Abbey, once part of a Benedictine Abbey, has stood in Crowland since as early as the 8th century, dedicated to Saint Mary the Virgin, Saint Bartholomew and Saint Guthlac.

Guthlac the monk lived the life of a hermit at Crowland (also known as Croyland) during. History of the Abbey of Crowland Crowland Abbey was a monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire, sixteen miles from Stamford and thirteen from Peterborough.

It was founded in memory of St. Guthlac early in the eighth century by Ethelbald, King of Mercia, but was entirely destroyed and the community slaughtered by the Danes in Croyland Abbey was a monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire, sixteen miles from Stamford and thirteen from Peterborough.

It was founded in memory of St. Guthlac, early in the eighth century, by Ethelbald, King of Mercia, but was entirely destroyed and the.

Please note: This text is based on a nineteenth-century public domain edition. Scholars planning to make extensive use of this work are encouraged to consult the newer edition, The Crowland Chronicle Continuations,edited by Nicholas Pronay and John Cox, printed for The Richard III and Yorkist History Trust by Alan Sutton Publishing, Inthe abbot of Croyland wrote to Thomas Cromwell, sending him a gift of fish: "ryght mekely besechyng yow lordship favorablye to accepte the same fyshe, and to be gud and favorable lorde unto me and my pore house".Despite these representations, the abbey was dissolved in The monastic buildings, including the chancel, transepts and crossing of the church appear to have been.

Abbey of Croyland † Catholic Encyclopedia Abbey of Croyland (Or Crowland.) A monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire, sixteen miles from Stamford and thirteen from Peterborough.

It was founded in memory of St. Guthlac. retired to the marshes of Crowland Abbey. She was built into a cell about and lived as a recluse to the end of her days. Crowland claimed her tomb was The A. “Croyland was built on a great bog in the fens of the Lincolnshire Holland. It was on an island lying between a number of streams, struggling towards the Wash, between the main streams of the Welland and the Nen It was a vast watery region of streams, lakes, woods, principally, it may be presumed, of alders and willows, of rank vegetation and wild fowl, with plenty of fat eels.

THE ABBEY OF CROWLAND. The origin and foundation of the monastery of Crowland are veiled in obscurity. Until the first quarter of the nineteenth century was past, a history purporting to have been written by Ingulf, the first Norman abbot, from the muniments of the house and the materials of his predecessors, was accepted as a genuine and valuable chronicle.

Crowland was founded by St Guthlac in ; though it was sacked by the Vikings, and had to start all over again in the 10 th century.

The Abbey was remote, and back in the 15 th century was on an island on the edge of the Fens; but don’t let that fool you that the chronicles were ill-informed. The Chronicles were started by a monk called Ingulph, and they were continued through various.

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It was written at the BenedictineAbbey of Croyland, in Lincolnshire, England, off and on from toand its first author claimed to be 'Ingulph' or 'Ingulf' of Croyland'. This author is now referred to as Pseudo-Ingulf. One such was the abbey of Croyland (now known as Crowland) in Lincolnshire.

On 29 December - the Feast of St Thomas the Martyr (St Thomas Becket) - the Project Archivist visited Crowland. At the heart of the town can be found the remains of the former Benedictine abbey, today used as the Anglican parish church, dedicated to St Mary, St. Crowland Abbey, aka Croyland Abbey, is a Church of England parish church, formerly part of a Benedictine abbey church, in Crowland in the English county of Lincolnshire.

It was founded in memory of St. Guthlac, a monk who came to an island in the Fens to live as a hermit between andby Ethelbald, King of Mercia, but was entirely. Find the perfect crowland stock photo. Huge collection, amazing choice, + million high quality, affordable RF and RM images.

No need to register, buy now. Lincolnshire Life - the county's favourite magazine. Drive to Crowland Abbey along the lonely fen roads on a misty December afternoon as the dusk is falling and you feel as though you are driving into the past, when the world seemed to consist only of water and sky; where small, isolated communities clung to muddy islands that raised themselves a few feet out of the undrained fens.

The Third Continuation of the History of Croyland Abbey: July, – March, with Notes His natural disposition was far more inclined to the study and writing of books, than attending to the strifes and tempests of secular occupations; so much so in fact, that some manuscripts in the monastery, which were written at his expense, as.

Crowland, or Croyland, Abbey in Lincolnshire was founded in the 8th century. Details Category: Photographs Object Number: //18 type: photograph taxonomy: visual and verbal communication; credit: The Kodak Collection at the National Media Museum, Bradford.

Books and journals Attwater, Gresley, P, The Fortification made round Croyland Abbey in the civil Wars, () Knowles, D, Medieval Religious Houses Other correspondence ref. HSD9/2/, Department of the Environment, Proposed Works at Crowland Abbey, Crowland, Lincolnshire, () Listed Building description, Department of.

Listed Building description, Department of the Environment, Crowland Abbey [ref. TF 18/4], () Reverend Crust, () Stocker, DA, The Early Church in Lincolnshire,forthcoming Swift, Rev.

Stanley, A Visitor's Guide to Croyland Abbey and Trinity Bridge,Official Guide. Somewhat confusingly, Croyland Abbey is in the market town of Crowland. The Benedictine Abbey was founded by King Ethelbald in in memory of St Guthlac.

It was dissolved in The north aisle now serves as the parish church. These bells were the first in the country to be broadcast live by the BBC, in undated postcard. The Croyland Chronicle (–), an important source for medieval historians, is believed to be the work of some of the monastery's inhabitants.

The town was nearly destroyed by fire (–), but the abbey tenants were given money to rebuild it. Croyland (or CROWLAND), Abbey of, a monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire, sixteen miles from Stamford and thirteen from Peterborough.

It was founded in memory of St. Guthlac, early in the eighth century, by Ethelbald, King of Mercia, but was entirely destroyed and the community slaughtered by the Danes in The Benedictine abbey of Crowland (or Croyland) in Lincolnshire produced a medieval chronicle for which the two fifteenth-century works were contemporary continuations.

The First Continuation, written by an anonymous prior of Crowland, concludes in January and pertains mainly to the history of the abbey. Page - Antiquarian Library, ), ]) When both armies had now become so extremely fatigued with the labour of marching and thirst that they could proceed no further, they joined battle near the town of Tewkesbury.

After the result had long remained doubtful, King Edward at last gained a glorious victory. Upon this occasion, there were slain on the queen's side, either on the field or. Croyland Abbey is a lovely 8th century abbey, parts of which have survived as the parish church of Crowland village.

Sharp-eyed readers will note that the name of the abbey and the village are spelled differently. The discrepancy is rumoured to be the result of a mistake in spelling by a medieval monk. Abbey of Croyland — Abbey of Croyland † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Abbey of Croyland (Or Crowland.) A monastery of the Benedictine Order in Lincolnshire, sixteen miles from Stamford and thirteen from Peterborough.

It was founded in memory of St. Guthlac. Croyland Abbey, Lincolnshire. The Benedictine Croyland (Crowland) Abbey is in the south Lincolnshire fen area. Croyland was one of a number of islands set in the mist of mostly marsh and wetland.

It began AD as a small church and hermitage when Saint Guthlac arrived at the spot. He, along with others, set up the cells and an oratory. Croyland--Croyland Abbey is a cathedral size church of the Anglo-Saxon abbey whose ruins are on the site. The part that survives is the parish church. Deeping St James—Deeping St James Priory church was once the church of a Benedictine monastery.

It seems likely that the monks of Croyland had intended to build a second large Abbey Church here at Whaplode and perhaps to have created a ‘daughter-house’ for the main Abbey. The earliest work, which dates from is massively constructed and looks disproportionate to.

Croyland Abbey: Population: 3, (Parish) OS grid reference Lincolnshire: Crowland is a village and civil parish in South Holland, Lincolnshire, England.

In there were 3, people living in Crowland. References This page was last changed on 14 Februaryat   One of the absurdities of the book is the story of the five sempectæ or senior members of the house, who, in order to account for the preservation of the traditions of the convent, are made to live to immense ages, one toanother to years, and one of them, a fabulous Aio, to about years.

An artist's impression of the reconstruction of Croyland Abbey shows a monk raising a basket of bricks to a second monk while a third holds a tool (perhaps a hammer or ax), Crowland, Lincolnshire, England, early s. The reconstruction, begun during the abbacy of Joffrid of Orleans inmarked the third time the abbey had been rebuilt.

Croyland Benedictine Abbey, Lincs - - jpg × ; KB Croyland-Abbey, Blick zum Chorbogen des 1, × 2,; KB × ; 53 KB. Guthlac was the son of Penwalh or Penwald, a noble of the English kingdom of Mercia, and his wife sister is also venerated as St a young man, Guthlac fought in the army of Æthelred of subsequently became a monk at Repton Monastery in Derbyshire at the age of 24, under the abbess there, Repton being a double monastery.

Two years later he sought to live the life of a.Account of Croyland, where Alan de Creoun is said to have died in the very year of his first donation to Croyland. The mistake was Mr. Gough's, In his account of Croyland abbey.

The following is the pas- sage of Petrus Blesensis, which seems to have led to it: Cernens au- tem nobilis baro Alanus de Credona dictum Regelll Henricnm Cellam.For more than eight hundred years the abbey of Croyland in the Lincolnshire fens has served God's cause.

"John Wells' reign as abbot has lasted a mere twenty four of these, but the weight of the centuries lay on his shoulders. If any could bear it, his could.

They were broad and unstooping". Uncertain times face the ancient abbey.

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